fieldset-grouped:
 

The Public Safety Group Blog

 

What Happens If You Fail the National Registry Exam?

by  Rachael Rosen     Dec 30, 2013

Immediately after taking the NREMT exam, I came to work deflated and anxious, so I channeled my energy into writing a contrite yet informative post on what the next steps are if you don’t pass. At that time, the only thing I was confident about was that I had indeed failed.

Then, miraculously, I logged in to the NREMT website for the umpteenth time in 24 hours to learn my results, and I'd passed! I was so relieved and felt proud of what I had accomplished.

But I really had felt like I’d failed. So take it from me--try your best to relax after taking the test. Remember, if you’re doing well, the test is designed to get harder, which can leave you with that feeling of defeat.

I wish all of you luck in your studying and on the day of your exam, but if you do need to take the NREMT again, here is a list of your options. This information is pulled directly from the NREMT website since they are, after all, the authority on this.

What kind of feedback will I receive to help me study for my retest?

From the National Registry website:

Candidates who fail to meet entry-level competency will be sent information sheets regarding their testing experience.  This information is useful for identifying areas to concentrate study in preparation for the next attempt.  The information sheets indicate if a candidate is “above,” “near,” or “below,” the level of entry-level competency in the various content areas.  Candidates who are “above” the standard can be somewhat confident they have sufficient knowledge in that content area, allowing them to pass the exam. However, failure to review the material in that content area can result in failing the exam again. Candidates who are “near” the standard can be slightly above or slightly below the standard and should certainly study these areas.  Being “near” does not indicate pass or fail but it can be interpreted as an area to study. Candidates who are “below” the standard need to enhance their study in this area.  Candidates who fail the examination will have test items for future attempts “masked.”  This means a masked item will not appear on future exams taken by that candidate. Studying examination items to prepare to do the job of an EMT is not helpful.  Studying the tasks and the job of an EMT provides the best preparation. Candidates who memorize items in hopes of “getting them right,” the next time are wasting their time because masking items prevents them from seeing the same item again.

A CAT examination is very precise in determining a candidate’s level of competency.  Candidates who fail the exam and do not study for their next attempt will most likely be measured at the same level as when they took the exam the first time. Failing candidates who do not change their ability level (be able to jump higher) will again be measured the same. The best way to improve ability is to practice—in this case, study.

(http://www.nremt.org/nremt/about/about_exams.asp December 30, 2013)

When can I sign up for my retest?

You can apply for your retest 15 days after the previous exam attempt.

(https://www.nremt.org/nremt/about/reg_basic_history.asp#Cognitive_Exam_Retest_Information December 30, 2013)

How many times can I take the test?

You can take the test up to 6 total times before you run out of attempts. Read directly from the National Registry website for the details:

Candidates are given six opportunities to pass the cognitive examination provided all other requirements for National EMS Certification are met. After three attempts, candidates must submit official documentation verifying completion of 24 hours of remedial training. The candidate is given three additional attempts to pass, provided all other requirements for National Certification are met. Candidates who fail to pass after a total of six attempts are required to repeat the entire Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) course.

(https://www.nremt.org/nremt/about/reg_basic_history.asp#Cognitive_Exam_Retest_Information December 30, 2013)

I think the NREMT is to be commended for cautioning candidates who fail from reattempting the exam without significant studying. Maybe you were just having an off day, but what are you going to do to help you feel ready for your reattempt?

Studying for the NREMT?
Download our essential test-taking tips!
 

Stay Connected

Categories

Search Blogs

Featured Posts

What Happens If You Fail the National Registry Exam?

by  Rachael Rosen     Dec 30, 2013

Immediately after taking the NREMT exam, I came to work deflated and anxious, so I channeled my energy into writing a contrite yet informative post on what the next steps are if you don’t pass. At that time, the only thing I was confident about was that I had indeed failed.

Then, miraculously, I logged in to the NREMT website for the umpteenth time in 24 hours to learn my results, and I'd passed! I was so relieved and felt proud of what I had accomplished.

But I really had felt like I’d failed. So take it from me--try your best to relax after taking the test. Remember, if you’re doing well, the test is designed to get harder, which can leave you with that feeling of defeat.

I wish all of you luck in your studying and on the day of your exam, but if you do need to take the NREMT again, here is a list of your options. This information is pulled directly from the NREMT website since they are, after all, the authority on this.

What kind of feedback will I receive to help me study for my retest?

From the National Registry website:

Candidates who fail to meet entry-level competency will be sent information sheets regarding their testing experience.  This information is useful for identifying areas to concentrate study in preparation for the next attempt.  The information sheets indicate if a candidate is “above,” “near,” or “below,” the level of entry-level competency in the various content areas.  Candidates who are “above” the standard can be somewhat confident they have sufficient knowledge in that content area, allowing them to pass the exam. However, failure to review the material in that content area can result in failing the exam again. Candidates who are “near” the standard can be slightly above or slightly below the standard and should certainly study these areas.  Being “near” does not indicate pass or fail but it can be interpreted as an area to study. Candidates who are “below” the standard need to enhance their study in this area.  Candidates who fail the examination will have test items for future attempts “masked.”  This means a masked item will not appear on future exams taken by that candidate. Studying examination items to prepare to do the job of an EMT is not helpful.  Studying the tasks and the job of an EMT provides the best preparation. Candidates who memorize items in hopes of “getting them right,” the next time are wasting their time because masking items prevents them from seeing the same item again.

A CAT examination is very precise in determining a candidate’s level of competency.  Candidates who fail the exam and do not study for their next attempt will most likely be measured at the same level as when they took the exam the first time. Failing candidates who do not change their ability level (be able to jump higher) will again be measured the same. The best way to improve ability is to practice—in this case, study.

(http://www.nremt.org/nremt/about/about_exams.asp December 30, 2013)

When can I sign up for my retest?

You can apply for your retest 15 days after the previous exam attempt.

(https://www.nremt.org/nremt/about/reg_basic_history.asp#Cognitive_Exam_Retest_Information December 30, 2013)

How many times can I take the test?

You can take the test up to 6 total times before you run out of attempts. Read directly from the National Registry website for the details:

Candidates are given six opportunities to pass the cognitive examination provided all other requirements for National EMS Certification are met. After three attempts, candidates must submit official documentation verifying completion of 24 hours of remedial training. The candidate is given three additional attempts to pass, provided all other requirements for National Certification are met. Candidates who fail to pass after a total of six attempts are required to repeat the entire Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) course.

(https://www.nremt.org/nremt/about/reg_basic_history.asp#Cognitive_Exam_Retest_Information December 30, 2013)

I think the NREMT is to be commended for cautioning candidates who fail from reattempting the exam without significant studying. Maybe you were just having an off day, but what are you going to do to help you feel ready for your reattempt?

Studying for the NREMT?
Download our essential test-taking tips!
 

Tags